Silver For The People

Silver Stackers Can End The Silver Manipulation And Stop The Criminal Banksters

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ALL CONTENT ON 'SILVER FOR THE PEOPLE' AS WELL AS THE 'BROTHERJOHNF' YOUTUBE CHANNEL IS PROVIDED FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY. 'SILVER FOR THE PEOPLE' ASSUMES ALL INFORMATION TO BE TRUTHFUL AND RELIABLE; HOWEVER, THE CONTENT ON THIS SITE IS PROVIDED WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED. NO MATERIAL HERE CONSTITUTES "INVESTMENT ADVICE" NOR IS IT A RECOMMENDATION TO BUY OR SELL ANY FINANCIAL INSTRUMENT, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO STOCKS, COMMODITIES, OPTIONS, BONDS, FUTURES, OR BULLION. ACTIONS YOU UNDERTAKE AS A CONSEQUENCE OF ANY ANALYSIS, OPINION OR ADVERTISEMENT ON THIS SITE ARE YOUR SOLE RESPONSIBILITY.

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Revolver Maps

This Fascinating City Within Hong Kong Was Lawless For Decades

merkinvestments.com / Axel Merk, Merk Investments / September 13, 2017

Okay, so I don’t have grandchildren yet, but I want to increase the odds you read beyond the title if you are old enough to have grandchildren. Should the investment advice we give to someone young truly be different from that given to someone old? And given where asset prices are, is it responsible to tell anyone to pile into the markets? Here are my thoughts on the topic, hopefully applicable not just for my children:

Hedge fund manager Ray Dalio likes to say he chose the first stock he ever bought because it cost less than $5 a share, given that his savings from caddying at the time were, well, five bucks. That story is a great icebreaker but also highlights with what’s wrong with our industry: when we think about investing, we immediately think about the stock market. Let’s take a step back.

My oldest recently returned back to college having completed a summer job. Thanks to our “Golden College Fund” (our kids’ college savings is in physical gold; please see this 2014 Forbes article for details), our son in the fortunate position that he doesn’t have to pay off college debt with his earnings. If he did, paying off college debt – like any other debt – is a choice of whether one expects a higher rate of return with one’s investments (after tax) than if one were to pay off the debt. It’s also a choice of risk tolerance, as a debt-free person has much less to worry about.

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